CIPH members are still very concerned about developing policies and standards regarding lead for plumbing products in Canada.

Canadian Institute of Plumbing & Heating (CIPH) members are still very concerned about developing policies and standards regarding lead for plumbing products in Canada. Since the April 2010 Advocacy Link Update, two significant developments have occurred.

  • The NSF Drinking Water Additives Joint Committee has approved the release of NSF 372 Drinking Water System Components - Lead Content. This new standard allows products to be evaluated to only a low-lead criteria without having to be fully NSF 61 certified. NSF 61 - Annex G now refers users to the new standard. 

    Currently in Canada, certified plumbing products are already required to conform to NSF 61 for material safety. The new NSF 372 standard is a method that could be used to demonstrate compliance to a 0.25% weighted average lead requirement. According to the CIPH, there is no regulation in Canada that requires compliance to this standard. However, the organization is in constant communication with all provinces and territories should any changes occur. 

    In the meantime, the Institute has received reports that some municipalities, building managers and school districts have begun to inquire on low-lead plumbing products to manage their local, site-specific lead concerns. CIPH has asked if you are aware of this type of activity to alert them immediately.   

    For more information on the new standard please contact NSF at 1-800-NSF-MARK .


  • According to Health Canada, there are no new lead regulations planned for the plumbing industry in the near future. In Canada, the National Plumbing Code already references CSA B125 which currently stipulates a maximum lead content criteria of 8%.  The Institute is aware that Health Canada has been working on the lead issue by monitoring changes to U.S. regulations and continuing to reevaluate their own base science and key policies.


    Source: CIPH


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